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Chapman, Emma: First Light

Switching on Stars at the Dawn of Time
Opens a window into a previously dark and secret time in our universe's history: when the first stars were born. Astronomers have successfully observed a great deal of the Universe's history, from recording the afterglow of the Big Bang to imaging thousands of galaxies, and even to visualising an actual black hole. There's a lot for astronomers to be smug about. But when it comes to understanding how the Universe began and grew up, we are literally in the dark ages. In effect, we are missing the first one billion years from the timeline of the Universe. This brief but far-reaching period in the Universe's history, known to astrophysicists as the 'Epoch of Reionisation', represents the start of the cosmos as we experience it today. The time when the very first stars burst into life, when darkness gave way to light. After hundreds of millions of years of dark, uneventful expansion, one by the one these stars suddenly came into being. This was the point at which the chaos of the Big Bang first began to yield to the order of galaxies, black holes and stars, kick-starting the pathway to planets, to comets, to moons, and to life itself. Incorporating the very latest research into this branch of astrophysics, this book sheds light on this time of darkness, telling the story of these first stars, hundreds of times the size of the Sun and a million times brighter, lonely giants that lived fast and died young in powerful explosions that seeded the Universe with the heavy elements that we are made of. Dr Emma Chapman tells us how these stars formed, why they were so unusual, and what they can teach us about the Universe today. She also offers a first-hand look at the immense telescopes about to come on line to peer into the past, searching for the echoes and footprints of these stars, to take this period in the Universe's history from the realm of theoretical physics towards the wonder of observational astronomy.Throughout First Light, Chapman's authenticity and humour shine through . In short, this is a charming book that is as fun to read as it is informative, making it as ideal for the casual reader as for those with an existing understanding of the field.
Autor Chapman, Emma
Verlag Bloomsbury
Einband Fester Einband
Erscheinungsjahr 2020
Seitenangabe 304 S.
Meldetext Lieferbar in ca. 10-20 Arbeitstagen
Ausgabekennzeichen Englisch
Masse H21.6 cm x B13.5 cm 438 g
Coverlag Bloomsbury Sigma (Imprint/Brand)
Opens a window into a previously dark and secret time in our universe's history: when the first stars were born. Astronomers have successfully observed a great deal of the Universe's history, from recording the afterglow of the Big Bang to imaging thousands of galaxies, and even to visualising an actual black hole. There's a lot for astronomers to be smug about. But when it comes to understanding how the Universe began and grew up, we are literally in the dark ages. In effect, we are missing the first one billion years from the timeline of the Universe. This brief but far-reaching period in the Universe's history, known to astrophysicists as the 'Epoch of Reionisation', represents the start of the cosmos as we experience it today. The time when the very first stars burst into life, when darkness gave way to light. After hundreds of millions of years of dark, uneventful expansion, one by the one these stars suddenly came into being. This was the point at which the chaos of the Big Bang first began to yield to the order of galaxies, black holes and stars, kick-starting the pathway to planets, to comets, to moons, and to life itself. Incorporating the very latest research into this branch of astrophysics, this book sheds light on this time of darkness, telling the story of these first stars, hundreds of times the size of the Sun and a million times brighter, lonely giants that lived fast and died young in powerful explosions that seeded the Universe with the heavy elements that we are made of. Dr Emma Chapman tells us how these stars formed, why they were so unusual, and what they can teach us about the Universe today. She also offers a first-hand look at the immense telescopes about to come on line to peer into the past, searching for the echoes and footprints of these stars, to take this period in the Universe's history from the realm of theoretical physics towards the wonder of observational astronomy.Throughout First Light, Chapman's authenticity and humour shine through . In short, this is a charming book that is as fun to read as it is informative, making it as ideal for the casual reader as for those with an existing understanding of the field.
Fr. 32.90
Verfügbarkeit: Am Lager
ISBN: 978-1-4729-6292-8
Verfügbarkeit: Lieferbar in ca. 10-20 Arbeitstagen

Über den Autor Chapman, Emma

Emma Chapman is a Royal Society research fellow and fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, based at Imperial College London. She is among the world's leading researchers in search of the first stars to exist in our Universe and has been the recipient of multiple commendations and prizes, including the 2018 Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship and STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellowship, as well as the Institute of Physics Jocelyn Bell Burnell Prize and the Royal Society Athena Medal. Emma is a respected commentator on astrophysical matters and regularly contributes to the Guardian and BBC radio, and speaks at public events. @DrEOChapman

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